Verticals vs Dipoles

“Dipoles are better than verticals.”

If you’ve heard this before you won’t be surprised but I hadn’t and it really shocked me.

For years we had been taught to put up dipoles for stateside contacts and verticals for dx.    “They” said dipoles have 2.2 dB gain over isotropic and verticals are better low angle radiators.  Both are at best half truths.  More accurate thinking would be to put up a vertical only when a dipole can’t be erected at the proper height or length.  Below is an explanation of why dipoles should normally always be the first choice.

“The dipole is the basic building block of many antennas. A dipole does NOT have 2.2 dB gain over an isotropic radiator when the dipole is placed over earth. The dipole has about 8.5 dB gain over an isotropic radiator! Always remember this when you see antenna models over earth given in dBi. If the model over earth shows a “gain” of about 8.5 dBi, the model effectively has the same gain as a dipole.” – http://www.w8ji.com/antennas.htm  (Tom Rauch)

I “fact-checked” Tom’s comment by using EZNEC to model a dipole one half wavelength above average ground. Gain numbers are in the same ball park as Tom’s considering he was modelling at 145 feet above ground and I was using a more attainable 33 feet.  In this case the model does seem to agree with Tom.

Screenshot 2016-01-27 16.00.16

For a rigorous explanation see Joel Hallas, W1ZR, in QST, November, 2015 p44, Antenna Gain, Part 1:  What Do The Numbers Really Mean?.

Verticals ground mounted over average soil conductivity with adequate radials don’t have any gain.  This model shows gain of 0 dBi. In other words you’d be giving up 8db of gain by using a vertical instead of a dipole.

(I’m planning on inserting a model of a quarter wave vertical with ground radials over average ground here as soon as I can find someone with NEC4.  NEC2 supposedly can’t model ground interaction very well and that’s half of a vertical antenna)

Next we model the identical antennas but this time we look only for the gain at a take off angle of 15 degrees.  We chose 15 degrees because many DXers believe this is the optimum take off angle to work the most countries.

From Jim Brown, K9YC:

Ah, some say – but the vertical doesn’t do nearly as well at the high angles that support short distance propagation. Yes, that’s true – but: 1) Don’t forget inverse square law – field strength falls as the square of the distance, so stations at 800 miles are 6 dB closer than stations at 1,600 miles and 9 dB closer than stations at 2,300 miles! You don’t need as much signal to work those closer stations.

In closng the soil determines how well a vertical will work.  The one time verticals will outperform dipoles is if they’re over salt water or on a salt water beach.

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Perfect Antenna for April 1

Too bad it’s August 1 instead of April 1.  I ran across this ideal antenna while modeling some other antennas in EZNEC.  It would be too good to be true except on that one day of the year.   Of course, it’s true.  What’s not to be trusted?  It is modelled in EZNEC to prove it.  The name of the antenna is SUPERGAIN.  As can be seen in the view ant window below it is a triangular loop.

Click to enlarge

Screenshot 2015-07-31 09.23.55

So far so good. It’s a simple wire antenna.  Here’s a look at the FF Plot to show the pattern and the gain.   The gain figures are in the notes below the pattern.  Gain of 23.85 dBi and at a fairly low angle, too.  I’ll round that out to 24dBi.

Click to enlarge

Screenshot 2015-07-31 09.32.29

This antenna is modeled over real ground by the way, not free space. What a fantastic dx antenna.  I’m pretty sure “fantasy” is the operative word here.  But let’s take this at face value for now.

What could be done with an antenna with 24 dB of gain?    We could put 1 watt in and have an effective radiated power (ERP) of over 200 watts.   We wouldn’t need linear amplifiers any more. We wouldn’t need towers and beams or any other antennas. If we used a typical transceiver with it’s 100 watts the ERP would be 20,000 watts. Or a qrp-er could use 5 watts and have an ERP of 1000 watts.   Hmmm.  This is a really nice antenna and don’t forget from the plot all that radiation is going out at fairly low angles.

What is fooling EZNEC or why haven’t we heard about this wonderful contraption before? What’s going on here?

Installing JT65

Running JT requires three packages:   WSJT-X, Timing, and JT-Alert.

1.  JT.   Although there are many software packages that provide WSJT support, WSJT-X is my current favorite because it contains both JT65 and JT9 in the same package and also becasue it’s written by the originator of WSJT, Dr. Joe Taylor.  First step is to Google “wsjt-x”.

wsjt-x > WSJTX – Physics > Latest Windows release:1.7 > WSJTX_xxxxxxx.exe

Installation:  Accept all defaults, then:

Click setup and check the boxes for items 4 through 12.  Next click “configuration” and the following screen will pop up  (click to enlarge).  This sample configuration works for having an external interface.  For radios with USB interfaces scroll down to a blog posting farther down.  This is the screen to put in your call sign and grid locator.

wsjt-x config1

2. Timing setup to keep a pc accurate to within 1 second:

Meinberg is but one example of a way to keep your pc clock accurate to within one second. It’s my favorite.

Free Download NTP Software ntp-4.2.8p9-win32-setup.exe (3.72 MB)
NTP package with IPv6 support for Windows XP and newer

Accept defaults on each page but watch closely for the word “none”.  When you see the word none, replace it with United States of America.   Create a new login with your call letters and a password of your choice.  Test by running the program “Quick NTP Status”.   If it’s working correctly you should see 3 or more ntp servers listed. If you don’t see three lines similar to the screenshot below, start the meinberg installation over.

screenshot-2017-02-09-08-26-58

3. Finally we install jt-alert:

 jt-alert > HamApps.com > HamApps JTAlert v2.9.0 : Download

Accept defaults and then configure the way you like it.  I did mine this way:

Settings>Manage settings>logging>Standard ADIF File.    Click Enable Standard ADIF File Logging and enter the path of your choice in the field Log File.   I keep my log in the cloud at Dropbox so the file is on the internet and not on any one specific pc.

C:\Users|MarkH\Dropbox\Ham\log.adi

JT-Alert provides all sorts of nice features to make operating easier.  One of my favorites is an audible reminder when each minute is up.

For help and questions, my email address is w0ql-at-arrl.net.

Dipole replaces mag loop

The AEA Isoloop was working as designed and making contacts but this dipole is blowing the doors off the loop.  I’m actually seeing dx from Europe and this afternoon I worked France.  That is the first QSO with Europe since we moved into this condo.  Disappointingly the Isoloop never was able to achieve that goal.  Tonight I worked European Russia with the dipole.    I love it.

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Constructed of electric fence insulators mounted on the lanai screens, I stuck hookup wire in the insulators and a MFJ 1:1 current balun in the middle.  I had to hunt for the insulators but I found them at Murdoch’s Farm and Ranch Supply. Amazing what one can do with wire antennas.

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